William Saunderson-Meyer
William Saunderson-Meyer

A triumphant year for the judiciary

The man who casts himself proudly as “100% Zulu boy” is set for a victory worthy of the Zulu hero, King Shaka. This weekend President Jacob Zuma will vanquish all at the African National Congress’ leadership contest, with his formidable impi.

The size of the KwaZulu-Natal of delegation to Mangaung should easily ensure that the ANC will contest the 2014 elections with Zuma at its head. His surviving a full term is another story. Unless Zuma now suddenly starts to lead effectively, events may well deal him the same humiliation as it did to his predecessor, former president Thabo Mbeki — an internal coup d’état.

As the Marikana massacre signalled, the mix of deprivation and frustration can quickly turn explosive. South Africa is not, however, a powder keg waiting to detonate. The Constitution, despised by some in the ANC as thwarting the popular will, has ironically benefited the party in that it has diverted populist anger at ANC failures into peaceful solutions.

Given SA’s weak parliamentary checks and balances, compounded by a governing party imbued with the arrogance that accompanies unassailable majorities, the judiciary is a powerful ally of those unfairly treated. In that regard, 2012 should go down in history as the Year of the Constitution.

Following the success of the Treatment Action Campaign in forcing an Mbeki volte-face on HIV/Aids, many activists turned their legal skills to other areas of state failure. They shaped the blunt instrument of the law into a precisely balanced scalpel and, especially over this past year, an array of organisations have put it to fine use excising cankers of corruption, trimming arrogant officialdom, and puncturing odorous pockets of indolence.

Section 27 — named after the section of the Constitution that determines socio-economic rights — won a high court victory that for the first time had public servants scrambling to implement Education 101: providing kids with textbooks. The court found that the failure of the basic education department to do so in many Limpopo schools was a violation of the Constitution.

School education, on which more is spent proportionately than anywhere else, to achieve the worst competency ratings anywhere, hasn’t been the same since. Although many schools nevertheless did not get their textbooks timeously and the minister miraculously escaped dismissal despite the corruption exposed as being behind the non-delivery, a ministry that for the first time has been held accountable is beginning to get its act together.

Since then Equal Education and the Legal Resources Centre have launched another landmark case to ensure minimum standards in school infrastructure. Section 27 and the LRC also backed the basic education ministry against the wall with a third action challenging its failure to fill vacant teaching posts.

These NGOs have made the courts a powerful component in achieving popular agendas. By restraining state authoritarianism and forcing state accountability this makes for more democracy, not less as is argued by the anti-constitutionalists in the ANC.

Aside from socio-economic delivery, the judiciary played a key role in human rights and accountability issues. The Constitutional Court ruled tellingly against political partisanship when it set aside the “irrational” appointment of a head of the National Prosecuting Agency and when the Supreme Court of Appeal ruled that the NPA had to produce the record justifying its 2009 decision to suspend criminal charges against Zuma.

There can also be no doubt that the threat of constitutional appeal has a restraining effect on government and its agencies.

Public Protector Thuli Madonsela, a particularly troublesome thorn in the flesh of officialdom, would long been dismissed on some pretext, were her office and position not constitutionally protected. And the reason why the Secrecy Bill and the Traditional Courts Bill have taken so long to wend their way through Parliament and have been extensively watered down, is a belated ANC attempt to make them immune to constitutional challenge.

It’s been a triumphant year for the judiciary. Given ANC attacks on the Constitution and the erosion of judicial independence inherent to the Legal Practice Bill, may it not be the last such.

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  • 43 Responses to “A triumphant year for the judiciary”

    1. The Dave Harris Propaganda Show #

      How dare you and the media mafia proclaim that an indendent judiciary is a good thing! Don’t you know that our nascnet democrcay is better served by a Soviet style judiciary beholden to the glorious and infallible party bosses! Your attempt to proclaim an independent judiciary to be a good thing is just an attempt to distract from the urgent issues we are facing such as land reform, and the need to nationalise all the mines etc etc…

      December 15, 2012 at 12:31 pm
    2. Casting Zuma and the ANC as a tribal organization by derogatory references to impis, cankers, odorous…etc is another example of your mean-spiritedness that simply polarizes and dehumanizes politics.
      Its ironic however, given the DA’s tribalism – a white tribal party which is simply the National Party V2.0. The DA pays lip service to non racialism by engaging in the shameful practice of fronting to give it credibility.

      This judgement is another pyrrhic victory for the rabid DA seeking to use our judiciary to slow don transformation. Hech, they even tried to use the courts to prevent renaming of the streets in Durban!!!

      Anyway, Section 27 is another of those NGOs secretly funded whose ultimate aim is to create divisions in our society. Even your “efficient” apartheid regime, delivered textbooks late on a regular basis. Governments throughout the world have inefficiencies, but NEVER in human history has any Minister of Education ever been taken to court for the late delivery of textbooks! It just shows how our judicial system is being abused.

      Our judiciary’s recent overturning of the e-tolling ruling by another apartheid judge is another example of how these NGO make a mockery of our judiciary!

      The Protection of State Information Bill and the Traditional Courts Bill are essential to restore our sovereignty as an African nation and strengthen our nascent democracy.

      December 15, 2012 at 4:53 pm
    3. Reducto #

      There are good aspects to the Legal Practice Bill. Firstly, there most certainly needs to be a greater burden on the legal profession to perform community service. Secondly, there needs to be greater control over what is charged by legal professionals. The fact that legal costs can destroy the average person financially is unacceptable.

      That said, the good is clearly overshadowed by the bad that unacceptably attacks the independence of the legal profession.

      December 15, 2012 at 5:13 pm
    4. Peter L #

      @Reducto
      The lack of accessability to the legal system is a problem throughout the Western world – those that have access are the poor (they qualify for legal aid) and the rich (they can afford to pay counsel ZAR 5,000 per hour plus).
      The midde classes are screwed.

      The same applies to medical services – the poor in SA get free medical services from the state (paid for by taxpayers) whilst the rich can afford the best services that private medicine has to offer.
      The middle classes pay ever increasing medical insrance premiums (medical aid) for ever declining benefits as a result of medical inflation continuously outsrtripping CPI.

      The single biggest cause of personal insolvency in the USA is medical bills that cannot be paid.

      Must be the fault of the rabid white tribal DA, I reckon.

      December 15, 2012 at 10:42 pm
    5. Reducto #

      @Harris: Once again, proving to be a shameless propaganda troll.

      “Anyway, Section 27 is another of those NGOs secretly funded whose ultimate aim is to create divisions in our society.”

      Zero evidence provided. Usual baseless claim. You should be ashamed of your pathetic attempts to smear a good faith NGO like Section 27, but then again, it is clear to all you have no shame.

      “Even your “efficient” apartheid regime”

      What the apartheid regime did does no excuse the late delivery of textbooks by the current government.

      “but NEVER in human history has any Minister of Education ever been taken to court for the late delivery of textbooks!”

      Where else have textbooks been delivered 6-10 months late? Despite the court order earlier in the year, it was necessary as late as October to go back to court. The department dragged its feet every step of the way, every step. You can’t deny that.

      Answer me this Harris: whereas in the world would Angie still be in the job?

      “It just shows how our judicial system is being abused.”

      Socio-economic rights are justiciable under our Bill of Rights. It is perfectly legitimate to litigate the matter. Maybe educate yourself before spewing propaganda?

      Harris, it is evident that you will the ANC no matter what. You are a defender of the indefensible, and will childishly make baseless claims against any organisation like Section 27 that fights for the rights of South Africans.

      Dave Harris, shameless propaganda troll,…

      December 16, 2012 at 12:12 am
    6. WTF #

      @ Dave:

      The kids need their books man. Black kids. White kids. Fat kids. Short kids. All of them kids.

      Section 27 are taking government on at issues of service delivery. Nobody cares who funds them or what their agenda is? Simple common sense, and a moral compass will allow any person of any colour to do the right thing.

      You could add some credence to your arguments if stopped blindly defending the ANC to make a point about how bad the DA is! These issues transcend petty politics between the ANC and the DA.

      December 16, 2012 at 6:49 am
    7. My thoughts #

      Even your “efficient” apartheid regime, delivered textbooks late on a regular basis.

      What! – so Dave does the ANC set its standards by what the National Party did?

      December 16, 2012 at 9:05 am
    8. Charlotte. #

      @ The Dave Harris Propaganda Show.
      Great stuff! But, tsk, tsk, you’ve left out ‘BOA”s, ‘the white madam’ and a few other cut-’n-paste, way-past-its-sellby-date unoriginals.

      December 16, 2012 at 9:20 am
    9. Reducto #

      @Peter L: “The lack of accessability to the legal system is a problem throughout the Western world – those that have access are the poor (they qualify for legal aid) and the rich (they can afford to pay counsel ZAR 5,000 per hour plus).
      The midde classes are screwed.”

      That is pretty much what I am getting at.

      But the problem is, the good aspect of the Legal Practice Bill, that seeks to make legal services more affordable, is overshadowed by the clear attack on the independence of the legal profession.

      December 16, 2012 at 11:46 am
    10. Roland Freisler #

      “The Protection of State Information Bill and the Traditional Courts Bill are essential to restore our sovereignty as an African nation and strengthen our nascent democracy.” Sure, sure, honest and true words from Dr Goebbels. Just like the Nuremberg Laws and the Enabling Act strengthened Germany’s sovereignty as a proud European nation and ensured democracy for all its citizens….

      December 16, 2012 at 4:47 pm
    11. Max #

      Remember how the Dalai Lama was refused entry into our country by of our ruling party government?

      A year later the judiciary has confirmed the disgusting behaviour of the ANC government prohibiting the Dalai Lama from entering our country.

      December 16, 2012 at 5:34 pm
    12. @Reducto
      Maybe if you cease the childish name-calling you will be able to think clearly and speak honestly.
      So again, is it up to me to provide “evidence” of these secretly funded NGOs????

      “What the apartheid regime did does no excuse the late delivery of textbooks by the current government.”
      But isn’t this the gold standard that you and your ilk claim when it comes to “service delivery”? – a unique South African-ism fabricated by the rabid DA and their media mafia to deflect from our real problems of obscene inequality, slow land reform, festering racism…

      @WTF
      Since when does the white tribal DA party really care about poor black kids?! If this were the case, then the sun will probably rise in the west tomorrow! ;-)

      “Nobody cares who funds them or what their agenda is”
      You may not care, but ANYONE who truly believes in democracy should insist of transparency of these NGOs. Secretly funded NGOs are one of the key factors that contribute to corruption in Africa.

      @Max
      For the record, the Dalai Lama visa fiasco was something I spoke out against the government for their stalling tactics.
      And it was not secretly funded NGOs that took the case to court, but two opposition parties – the IFP and Cope! Note the absence of the DA in this case!

      December 16, 2012 at 7:40 pm
    13. We are all subject to various human failings whether we post on this blog, are members of the DA or ANC, are not members of anything etc, etc. basically none of us is free from any failings thus we can really help one and other by pointing out one and others failings provided of course that receiver of the criticism is imbued with a firm resolve to make any changes that are needed.

      December 16, 2012 at 7:59 pm
    14. Max #

      DD says he spoke out against the ANC when they denied the Dalai Lama entry into the country. Another blatant lie from this propaganda troll. When Rod MacKenzie spoke out against the ANC, DD told him to heed Samantha Vice’s recommendations and shut the hell up.

      When others here suggest that DD shut up, he patronizes them, reminding them that we have freedom of speech in South Africa thanks to the wonderful ANC.

      December 17, 2012 at 10:32 am
    15. Reducto #

      @Harris: “But isn’t this the gold standard that you and your ilk claim when it comes to “service delivery”?”

      Again, you resort to putting words in my mouth because you debate like a child. I never said the apartheid government was the “gold standard”, but because you can’t refute my argument, you have to now resort to putting words in my mouth.

      “So again, is it up to me to provide “evidence” of these secretly funded NGOs????”

      You made the claim that Section 27 is seeking to create divisions, yet did not back it up, at all. (Create divisions by compelling the delivery of textbooks to school children after half the academic year has elapsed???) This is because you are a shameless propaganda troll who seeks to smear good faith NGOs fighting for people’s rights.

      Also, you keep refusing to answer these two questions I put to you:
      1. Where else in the world have textbooks been delivered 6-10 months late?
      2. Where else in the world would Angie will be in the job?

      The department dragged its feet every step of the way, and despite a court order earlier in the year, textbooks had still not been delivered as late as October!

      Let me repeat: Oct-frikkin-tober!!!

      If not for Section 27, these books probably would have never been delivered at all. But instead of commending them for standing up for the constitutional rights of school children, you defend the culprits and attempt to smear section 27. This is because you are a shameless propaganda troll who…

      December 17, 2012 at 11:33 am
    16. Reducto #

      @Max: “DD says he spoke out against the ANC when they denied the Dalai Lama entry into the country. Another blatant lie from this propaganda troll.”

      Actually he did…but it was an incredibly qualified “condemantion”, he handled the ANC government with kid gloves. It was probably the most pathetic, weak “condemnation” in history.

      December 17, 2012 at 1:25 pm
    17. @Max
      Unlike in your old apartheid regime, you can no longer get away with your white lies and DA (National Party v2.0) propoganda! Here is a sample of evidence proving that I spoke out against the governments decision:
      http://www.thoughtleader.co.za/azadessa/2009/03/24/dalai-lama-do-i-feel-guilty/
      http://mg.co.za/article/2011-10-13-sa-isnt-kowtowing-to-anyone-on-foreign-policy-insists-zuma
      Want more proof? ;-)

      @Reducto
      Don’t you see the hypocrisy by demanding transparency in government but turning a blind eye to corruption spread by secretly funded NGOs, supposedly acting in the “public interest”?!!!

      The secret funding of NGOs, who in reality, are sidekicks for the white tribal DA and/or other foreign governments, is one of the root causes of corruption in SA and developing countries around the world!

      December 17, 2012 at 7:34 pm
    18. Reducto #

      @Harris: What corruption spread by NGOs? Section 27 went to court to uphold the constitutional right of school children to education. Socio-economic rights are justiciable, so if the department of education drags its feet and doesn’t deliver textbooks for 6-10 months, it is perfectly legitimate to litigate the matter.

      Section 27 also supports the National Health Insurance, yet you call them a sidekick of the DA, on no evidence? Just another baseless claim by the resident propaganda troll.

      Face it, you are a shameless propaganda troll who will defend the indefensible, no matter what the ANC does, and attempt to smear good faith organisations that fight for the rights of others.

      December 17, 2012 at 8:47 pm
    19. Reducto #

      Also Harris, I am waiting for answers to these two questions:

      1. Where else in the world have textbooks been delivered 6-10 months late?
      2. Where else in the world would Angie still be in the job?

      December 17, 2012 at 8:48 pm
    20. ConCision #

      ANC Kleptocracy
      or
      A Law Unto Themselves
      or
      Get Out of Jail Free – Fake Getting Sick.
      – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – — – – – -
      Dishonestly on the make
      Disgustingly on the take
      Their pretence is real: their promises are fake
      And as far as the poor go, it’s “Let them eat cake.”

      December 18, 2012 at 9:04 am
    21. Loudly South African #

      During apartheid it was advocates like Bizos, Fischer, Kentridge and Maisels (none of whom were appointed to the judiciary) who held the state in check, causing Nat minister (and Nazi sympathiser) Oswald Pirow to remark angrily against some judges that thiought they were appointed on merit (i.e. acted independently, rather than as loyal strategically deployed cadres).

      With the New-ANC morphing more and more into the Nats and having to enforce more and more apartheid-legislation and cover-ups, it seems a new generation of human-rights lawyer-heroes will emerge.

      Expect more and more apoplexies from reincarNats like J783, Sisulu, Radebe, Mthethwa, Dave Harris, Duarte, Fransman and Cwele.

      December 18, 2012 at 10:49 am
    22. The Creator #

      The trouble is, a triumphant year for the judiciary basically means a triumphant year for the rich and powerful people behind the judiciary. It is worth noting, regarding Section27′s activities in Limpopo, that (apart from Dave Harris’ quite valid suspicions about who is funding the organisation) it is headed by a Zuma propagandist and that its activities seemed particularly intended to lay the blame for the lack of textbooks on the provincial authorities (whom Zuma wanted punished because they do not support him) rather than on the central Ministry which was responsible for the failure, having taken over the administration of education in the province a year earlier.

      The judiciary rarely does anything of value. Rather, it is capable of making propaganda which could be of service to the people. However, the judiciary is usually very careful not to do this in a way threatening to rich or powerful people. (Note that the TAC’s judicial victory in 2002 accomplished the remarkable achievement of enforcing the provision of a worthless drug — nevirapine, which proved to be wholly ineffectual at mother-child prevention –, a fact never discussed by any of the supporters of this victory.)

      December 18, 2012 at 10:57 am
    23. The Critical Cynic #

      Harris did speak out against the government over the Dalai Lama visa refusal – I recall his comments (see his links above), and I don’t believe they were all that kid glove either. I think what really upsets most people about Dave Harris is the way he accepts scandal after scandal sbout his partly without a peep against the blatant corruption…

      December 18, 2012 at 3:07 pm
    24. Cynic #

      I think what upsets people about Dave Harris is his obnoxious, aggressive persona, his inability to read and respond to arguments, and his frequent unadorned lies.

      December 19, 2012 at 5:15 pm
    25. Peter L #

      DD Harris
      I have challenged you many times to provide evidence in suppot of your allegations and opinions which are stated as fact, yet each time you fail to deliver, either not responding, or resorting to an ad hominen riposte.

      NGO’s and section 21 companies operating in South Africa are required to disclose their ownership by law (Income tax act, and companies act), as well as details of their income and expenditure.

      What evidence do you have that NGO’s are the root cause of corruption in Africa and other developing regions?

      My work takes me to many Sub-Saharan African countries, and I often deal with government officials, NGO’s and aid agencies.

      Most of the NGO’s and aid agencies are managed by ex-pats, and I have never once had a bribe solicited by an NGO or aid agency worker.

      Government officials are another matter, and one’s first encounter is normally at the airport.

      If you would like first hand experience of corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa and who is at the root of it, you are most welcome to join me on my next trip to Nigeria.

      December 21, 2012 at 9:17 pm
    26. ntozakhona #

      Peter L in most countries in Africa these NGOs are prohibited or tightly regulated as they are known to seek to undermine and discredit the work of governments, They project themselves as colonial saviours on a mission to save Africans from themselves.

      Who funds Section 27 and why? There many NGOs in my township who barely survive on the poverty wages of their subscribers, These NGOs are dedicated to assisting the African child with maths and science, providing after care for children whose parents spend literally the whole day generating profits for the colonial master. They are not funded yet Section 27 which fights battles already won has money to go the courts more than i go to the toilet.

      We had won the battle for textbooks provision when we defeated apartheid. Dave Harris, apartheid did not provide textbooks we had to purchase them. Where was Section 27?

      Let us hope that sense will begin to prevail in our judiciary after the landmark ruling by Dennis Davis counselling political parties not to attempt to win legally waht they fail to win politically.

      December 25, 2012 at 4:47 am
    27. Reducto #

      @ntozakhona:”We had won the battle for textbooks provision when we defeated apartheid. Dave Harris, apartheid did not provide textbooks we had to purchase them. Where was Section 27?”

      During apartheid there was not a justiciable Bill of Rights that provided a right to education. One could never have gone to court over the issue. Today you can.

      If the department of education has not delivered textbooks 6-10 months into the academic year, it is perfectly legitimate to litigate the matter.

      “Peter L in most countries in Africa these NGOs are prohibited or tightly regulated as they are known to seek to undermine and discredit the work of governments”

      The fact that some schools had not received textbooks as late as October, I repeat, October, discredits the ANC government. Section 27 just brought this to light.

      But it seems certain folks are more concerned about the ANC’s image than the right to children to education. Why attack Section 27 while not uttering a word of condemnation about the fact some schools did not have textbooks as late as October?

      December 25, 2012 at 1:23 pm
    28. ntozakhona #

      Reducto, my point exactly.

      We fought against apartheid and for the supply of free testbooks at the risk of being teargassed, detained and maimed to be where we are. Now again where was the suddenly courageous Section 27?

      Indeed there are inefficiencies in most if not all governments of the world. In other parts of the world NGO play the role of closing the gap, in Africa and South Africa in particular they have assumed the role of the opposition if not of counter revolutionaries.

      December 27, 2012 at 6:48 am
    29. Peter L #

      @ntozakhona

      Like DD, you are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own facts.

      I deal extensively with (mainly UN) aid agencies and NGO’s in Sub Saharan Africa and it is bald faced lie to suggest that these organisations “project themselves as colonial saviours on a mission to save Africans from themselves”

      The Doctors at medecins sans frontiers for example work 16 hour days often in appalling conditions for truck driver wages, whereas they could be earning literally ten times as much back home in their first world country.

      Similarly, the aid and development agencies are well meaning and well intentioned if often naive humanitarians whose only agenda is to help those in desperate need of help.

      It is true that they are often mistrusted and resented by host governments who are forced to witness these NGO’s doing the work that they the host government should be doing, but do not do, for to a variety of reasons.

      By the way, my wife works (unpaid) full time for a charitable organisation in our local township assisting children and adults (ABET) with basic education and caring for street children.

      The parents are normally parent singular – mother, as the African father has left long ago .

      The (normally female) head of household, if lucky enough to be employed, far from working for the colonial maaster, is smply trying to earn a living like the rest of us.

      You unintentionally prove the old adage – “No good deeds ever go unpunished”

      December 27, 2012 at 7:15 am
    30. ntozakhona #

      Reducto, I again refer you to the role played by under-resourcedNGOs in the townships and other NGOs in other parts of the world except Africa.

      December 27, 2012 at 8:09 am
    31. @ntozakhona
      If memory serves me right, I believe some black schools, including Coloured and Indian schools, were provided with some textbooks that would, without fail, never arrive on time, year after year. Of course, you’re right, the majority of African schools had to pay for their own textbooks even though they were the LEAST able to afford it – that was the evil of the apartheid system.
      And you’re absolutely right about the hypocrisy of NGOs like Section 27 and a slew of other recent secretly funded NGOs created to destabilize our democracy by tying up our precious judiciary resources on meaningless issues, and then they have the gall to complain about crime and corruption!!!

      @Reducto
      “During apartheid there was not a justiciable Bill of Rights that provided a right to education. One could never have gone to court over the issue.”
      You’re really putting your foot in it but defending the indefensible!

      December 27, 2012 at 6:06 pm
    32. Reducto #

      @Harris:

      “You’re really putting your foot in it but defending the indefensible!”

      Stop acting like a child. How am I defending the indefensible? It was a terrible thing there was no right to education during apartheid. It is a good thing that we can now go to court to defend that right.

      “And you’re absolutely right about the hypocrisy of NGOs like Section 27 and a slew of other recent secretly funded NGOs created to destabilize our democracy by tying up our precious judiciary resources on meaningless issues,”

      Education is not a meaningless issue. The fact that court action was required as late as October to compel delivery of textbooks is a daming indictment of the Department of Basic Education.

      Harris I am still waiting for an answer to these two questions:
      1. Where else in the world have textbooks been delivered 6-10 months late?
      2. Where else in the world would Angie still be in the job?

      Only Dave Harris, defender of the indefensible, propaganda troll, would accept such late delivery of textbooks.

      “Now again where was the suddenly courageous Section 27?”

      The lack of a justiciable Bill of Rights with a right to education made going to court on the issue impossible. Judges would have simply thrown out the matter. But now we do have the right, and it can be defended.

      Just because the judicial system unacceptably favoured the apartheid government in the past, does not change the fact that it is a good thing basic rights can be defended in…

      December 28, 2012 at 11:35 am
    33. Reducto #

      And Harris, as much as you bleat and spread your propaganda, you can’t change these facts:

      1. We have a Constitution.
      2. This Constitution contains a justiciable Bill of Rights.
      3. These include socio-economic rights like education and housing.

      So if the government falls short, it is perfectly legitimate to litigate the matter. Why don’t you think Angie and Co appealed? Because they would more than likely lose, all the way up to the Constitutional Court.

      Face facts Harris, you are wrong. You are a shameless propaganda troll who will defend the indefensible and cares more about the ANC’s image than the education of school children.

      December 28, 2012 at 11:39 am
    34. ntozakhona #

      Peter L again my point exactly. The NGOs you are refering to and the work your wife is doing are what NGO do, closing the gap where there are government inefficiencies.

      Were Doctors Without Borders begin interfere in political processes and try to score cheap political points they will be thoroughly discredited. Section 27 and so-called South African mainstream NGOs are a disguised front for the DA and elements seeking to defend the colonial status quo.

      I wll not go into a debate about who EARNS a living and who does not.Suffice to say some earn a living for those gallivanting the world and spending days at golf courses. Indeed African family life is being rebuilt by some genuine NGOs after it was destroyed through the compound and migrant labour system.

      I work for a self funding NGO that seeks to create employment through SMMEs. I founded it 20 years ago. Our task like of other non partisan NGO is to devise innovative solutions to problems confronting our communities NOT fight political battles on behalf of the DA or anyone.

      Dave Harris true but in most cases we did not even have those. If there were any, it was a priviledge not a right. The point is that elements who are vocal and spend endless resources fighting today did not lift a finger then. What is their agenda?

      December 28, 2012 at 4:04 pm
    35. ntozakhona #

      With due respect Peter L but were your wife to follow the pattern of the Right To Know and such other political formations trading as NGO her organisation would have close shop in the township and operate from the surburbs.

      That is what governments in the rest of Africa do, and in South Africa communities do it themselves, dissuade people feigning care to prove their assumed superiority.

      December 28, 2012 at 4:17 pm
    36. ntozakhona #

      Just remembered, which township has street children Peter L? Please assist, I am not saying it does not exist but frankly I do not know of any.

      December 28, 2012 at 4:22 pm
    37. Una #

      The Creator

      You are on the money. Your comments are based on well researched facts instead of imbibing the propaganda that is fuelled by devisive forces. Kudos to you

      December 29, 2012 at 11:33 am
    38. Reducto #

      “Section 27 and so-called South African mainstream NGOs are a disguised front for the DA and elements seeking to defend the colonial status quo.”

      Compelling the delivery of textbooks to underprivileged children is defending the status quo? If anything, the Department of Basic Education is responsible for the maintenance of the status quo, given the shoddy job it is doing.

      December 31, 2012 at 6:57 pm
    39. @Reducto
      The reason why the DA and their cohorts, like the secretly funded Section 27, have to resort to the courts to resolve basic issues like the late delivery of textbooks instead of democratic processes like protest, petitions etc. to apply pressure on non-performing government departments, is that:
      1. They lack the political support for their gutter politicking.
      2. They could care less about using up our precious judicial resources for frivolous matters.
      3. Together with their media cohorts are bent on creating divisions in our society.
      4. Their secretly funded NGOs operate with impunity to slow down transformation every step of the way.

      The fact that its the first time in human history that an Education Minister is taken to court for the late delivery of textbook, should open your eyes to the brazen abuse of our judicial system. Do you really expect us to believe that the DA and their sidekicks give a toss about poor black kids?!!! LOL

      January 2, 2013 at 8:15 am
    40. Reducto #

      Harris, the Department had to be taken to court AGAIN several months after the initial court order. And you tell me they would respond to petitions? Seriously?

      No, the Department made it necessary to resort to court action.

      Also, you keep refusing to answer these two questions I put to you:

      1. Where else in the world have textbooks been delivered 6-10 months late?
      2. Where else in the world would Angie will be in the job?

      The fact you consider education resources a frivolous matter says all we need to know about you. You are shameless.

      January 2, 2013 at 12:59 pm
    41. Reducto #

      And as I have pointed out, the right to education is justiciable. It is perfectly legitimate to litigate the matter. There is no abuse, only in your head where the ANC government does not wrong and you will defend the indefensible.

      January 2, 2013 at 1:20 pm
    42. ntozakhona #

      There are so many justiciable rights in the South African constitution. These include the right to shelter , health care and employment.. It is interesting to note the fights chosen by the so-called NGOs, they choose fights that will make a political statement that seeks to embarass the ANC than assist in delivery.

      There is a clear commitment on the part of government to deliver textbooks but in Limpopo it was caught up in inefficiencies that happen in the private sector. The Thought Leader moderator would be a case in point, An NGO would seek to ameliorate the situation not score cheap political points.

      The questions you are asking Reductio belong to the political sphere and contestation not in the NGO sphere . We will not trick anyone by pretending to be NGOs when we are hardcore well funded propagandists for a party of the bosses

      January 4, 2013 at 12:21 am
    43. ntozakhona #

      Corrigenda Reducto!

      January 4, 2013 at 12:24 am

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