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Dancing to the tune of whiteness?

By Sipho Singiswa

Almost 19 years after the 1994 election, institutionalised racism against indigenous African people has remained intact and largely unchallenged. The majority of Africans still live in poverty with very little access to land, housing, basic quality education, clean water and decent primary healthcare. All this is in violation of the much-praised South African Constitution.

In contrast to the false perception of a smooth transition from apartheid rule to the so-called democratic South Africa, historically-based social inequalities and injustices are still deeply entrenched. These social inequities mirror both the colonial and apartheid era and are fuelled by corrupt corporate giants and officials who regularly defraud the state out of trillions of rands in income.

The poverty that is engulfing indigenous African people is a deliberate and recycled pattern — a tool used by white corporate giants to advance business and political agendas of a white racist economy. The victim remains the marginalised black South African.

The white racist and neo-liberal apologists of this institutionalised racism and its economic subjugation of the other, will always try to wrestle the discussion away from any deep meaningful engagement. This is clearly seen in the way the merits of Gillian Schutte’s concerns, raised in her letter Dear White People, are massacred either by denial or a furious attack on her confrontation with the core subject of whiteness and privilege in South Africa.

Instead of interrogating the validity of the social issues raised by Schutte, the bigots chose to defend atrocious white behaviour and attitudes towards indigenous Africans while creating distractions that deviate from engaging with the core issues.

This they do by innuendos and threats, and by questioning Schutte’s legitimacy to speak her truth; to recognise whiteness, to openly point out and criticise such inhumane patterns that violate human rights and dignity.

But this is nothing new when it comes to whiteness responding to its own pathology. What we also witnessed was that they were not alone in questioning Schutte’s legitimacy; by their sides, a collective of co-opted black South Africans — including so-called “born-free” blacks — made similar accusations.

By association they then get pulled into this apartheid-styled tactic that racists use to prevent people from engaging in a genuine social dialogue that can help South Africa address the power dynamics of racism and social inequalities.

Indignant whining about the content of the letter and its implications served to circumvent any meaningful debate around entrenched white supremacy and its impact on the black collective.

Is it not true that the highest individual and collective earners in the South African economy are still the minority white males? Is it not true that those who still have access to prime land, the best medical care, schools, housing, sports and recreational facilities remain largely white … followed by the minority black elite?

Why is it when the habitual racist stereotyping of indigenous Africans occurs, this group of black people don’t protest about the lack of human rights and dignity for their fellow black South African? Yet, we often witness their eagerness to defend white attitudes whose negative impact on social cohesion they appear to be oblivious to.

Perhaps these are the “good blacks” people once referred to as the “clever blacks”. We have regularly seen the keenness of this group to emulate racist white behavioural patterns at the expense of their own cultural history and identity.

This group of black people have become the dogmatic and regular critics of their own blackness and being.

But even more worrying in post-1990 South Africa is the upsurge of confused young black South Africans looking for meaning in an increasingly hollow and horrifying landscape of joblessness and poverty.

Preying on this group are self-styled revolutionary plagiarists who — in their enthusiasm to create self-serving public profiles — often attack other activists with vindictiveness, as witnessed in Andile Mngxitama and Athi-Nangamso Esther Nkopo’s attack of Schutte’s letter.

His display of misogyny and patriarchal gatekeeping coupled with power hunger is as bad as the sickness of whiteness, and this is what Mngxitama fails to recognise in himself.

It is unfortunate that these revolutionary plagiarists masquerade as Steve Biko reincarnations while not having imbibed a jot of Biko’s intelligence or love of the collective. These “reborns” go around distorting the interpretation of Black Consciousness and taint the good memory of Steve Biko and Malcolm X.

By quoting these great revolutionary thinkers in vain and for their own gains they are only succeeding in entrenching the political confusion and cultural wilderness of the black South African youth from which they then feed off.

The myopic attitude and views of these “Biko wannabe’s” mirror those of their white racist counterparts who go out of their way to circumvent any meaningful dialogue around race. In the end they can only pat themselves on the back for serving the white cause by stunting the South African youth’s intellectual ability to manoeuvre, negotiate and force meaningful change in an anti-black socio-political landscape.

This group of people frequently contradict themselves by weighing black people down with their regurgitated rhetoric and tedious volumes of references from the books of authors whose insight and application they fail to fully grasp.

They want to make us believe indiscriminately that all people of European descent are inherently racist; incapable of reform, humanity, distinguishing between right and wrong and devoid of all compassion. Yet they quote European intellectuals, such as Žižek, to make this point. The contradiction is startling.

Just like their racist counterparts as well as white neo-liberal academics and intellectuals, these self-appointed gate keepers of African intelligentsia think that indigenous African people are stupid and incapable of independent intelligent thought processing.

What we need are mature and experienced revolutionaries to begin meaningful and empowering political education of the youth.

The time for authentic umrabulo is now!

Sipho Singiswa, a veteran of the liberation struggle, is an ex-MK underground operative and Robben Island prisoner. He now works as a social justice activist and filmmaker and is chair of the Black Filmmakers Network.

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  • 53 Responses to “Dancing to the tune of whiteness?”

    1. Mao Zedong #

      I hate to say it but in all of these great blogs that have been unleashed, as the wheel rolls larger and larger, collecting more and more responses as it rolls, there seems to be less and less logic involved. It seems like few of these blogs actually represent what other have said correctly or factually. Schutte’s blog said hardly anything about black people, and nothing meaningful about class, privilege or economics. Even this blog has many logical non sequiturs, where cause and effect relations are not examined, and plenty of circular arguments are stated. Forget the topic and look at the logic of ‘institutionalised racism against indigenous African people has remained intact and largely unchallenged. The majority of Africans still live in poverty with very little access to land, housing, basic quality education, clean water and decent primary health care. ‘ The second statement is an observation of fact. The first is stated as a cause. But there is not a clear attempt to link the two, which is entirely necessary to support the arguments that follow. And none of this conflicts with the statement that the majority of people should have all the above. But the logic of cause and effect, of class and race, of economics and social behaviour, of theory and reality, is becoming more and more lost in these blogs and very few of the arguments that have followed Schutte’s rather cynical polemic have followed rigorous arguments.

      January 11, 2013 at 5:53 pm
    2. Mo #

      Alot of what we all want for poor South Africans but has not happened is not because of white people.

      Our black government has failed us. Lets stop trying to fool ourselves into believing that this country is on slippery slope because of whites.

      I am not white. But after having read all these thoughts in the last few weeks, I want to leave SA. What hope can there be for a nation so divided?

      January 11, 2013 at 5:56 pm
    3. Max #

      Lots of emotive language. Such passion.

      If you were an artist, all your paintings would be in adamant black and white, or dramatic chiaroscuro at best.

      Thanks for the laugh bro.

      Hell.

      Shame man.

      January 11, 2013 at 6:01 pm
    4. Mao Zedong #

      Let’s take an example: They want to make us believe indiscriminately that all people of European descent are inherently racist; incapable of reform, humanity, distinguishing between right and wrong and devoid of all compassion. Yet they quote European intellectuals, such as Žižek, to make this point. The contradiction is startling.’ What does this mean? If they had quoted an African intellectual, such as Biko, to make this point, would it then have been a valid point? If so, why? Can only African intellectuals make valid observations about people of European descent? Following this logic, can only European intellectuals make valid observations about people of African descent? Surely European or African intellectuals could make equally valid observations about people of either descent, or is there some kind of odd, and deterministic reason why this is not so? There is just too little logic in all of these arguments, and I fear there is so much dogma out there that new, original and interesting observations will remain in the exception – and this applies to all these blogs, not only this one.

      January 11, 2013 at 6:03 pm
    5. Excellent blog Sipho!
      While many SA whites remain indoctrinated by apartheid ideology they nevertheless have begun to see it as wrong but not necessarily as evil to motivate them enough to change. Furthermore most find it hard to wean themselves off the spoils of apartheid since all our systems are setup to promote white supremacy from the cradle to the grave – education, media, economy, judiciary…

      Hopefully Gillian’s letter will awaken their conscious to spur them into action towards real transformation so that, in Gandhi’s words, they can “be the change” they wish to see in our world!

      January 11, 2013 at 6:12 pm
    6. Enough Said #

      I thought Gillian Schutte’s letter was excellent, but I now see it being used as a scapegoat by black people who are trying to make excuses for their own people messing up since 1994 and failing to run a just efficient transparent government that addresses apartheid’s injustice and inequalities.

      Time to take responsibility for your actions and stop blaming others.

      January 11, 2013 at 7:09 pm
    7. Lisa #

      Whiteness is now a pathology.

      I have to agree with Mo. One wonders if there is any hope.

      Next I’ll be expecting white literature to be banned as corrupting and whites to be barred from professions and public life as pathological.

      Holy cow, this is getting radical.

      Sheeet!

      January 11, 2013 at 8:20 pm
    8. Benzo #

      This debate and its previous related debates becomes funnier by the day from the vieuw point of a not native South African.

      It would be just amusing if it was not so sad.

      January 12, 2013 at 12:42 am
    9. Facts People #

      And this ranter is the thought leader editor? Thereby ends my reading thereof.

      January 12, 2013 at 3:06 am
    10. The Indigenous people of Africa are the Browns who were killed off by the migrating Blacks except in the Western Cape, where the ANC has been trying to finish the job for 18 years.

      You are all fiddling while Rome burns. Continual post after post after post about racism which is a deliberate distraction of your brains and intelligence from the real issues going on in Africa and the World:

      Arab Imperialism; Russian Imperialism; Chinese Imperialism; Global Warming (which is NOT man induced); Corrupt politicians; Incompetant Economists;Raping of the Land with Mining minerals; Running out of Resources; Overpopulation; Patriarchy etc etc etc

      January 12, 2013 at 3:10 am
    11. Unless Thoughtleader’s Editors can introduce some variety in topics this site will become repetitive and boring.

      January 12, 2013 at 3:11 am
    12. Non-Settler Sister #

      Please forgive my ignorance, but I have to ask;

      What do black people want from white people? What will make everything ok again?

      Please bear in mind that many of us came from background of poverty, but because of being white had the opportunities to go from having nothing to having something, so YES a lot of what we have was worked for, and really hard work was involved. Those same opportunities are now available to black people.

      Most white people just want to live a life of quality, and be successful. Why is this frowned upon?

      PLEASE. What must we do?

      We get angry because we see how our hard earned tax money is not used to uplift the poor (very little of it, yes). We get angry because our parents who cannot afford medical aid are treated like scum by black hospital staff at public hospitals, simply because they are white and are therefore assumed to be wealthy. I have often heard “why are they here?”

      I am so tired of being blamed for all that is wrong in South Africa. I have no power, political, economic or otherwise.

      Should I commit suicide and leave my meagre possessions to a black family? Will I then be forgiven? Will it fix all your problems?

      Please help me redeem myself…

      January 12, 2013 at 6:35 am
    13. mike venter #

      And another pseudo intellectual also had to add his bit of a rant. Black filmmakers network nogal and the editor of Thoughtleader.

      But let a white try some white film network and this man will scream rasicm with a high pitch voice.

      Thoughleader is seriously going to thw dogs now. Theres not much Thought left in this site anymore. And this from the editor! Would have expected more from him that this.

      January 12, 2013 at 6:53 am
    14. Max #

      Is this the editor of Thoughtleader?

      January 12, 2013 at 9:03 am
    15. Tom Evans #

      Truth be told, the only thing holding blacks back is culture and education. Do not blame whites for this.

      January 12, 2013 at 9:04 am
    16. Castro #

      “The poverty that is engulfing indigenous African people is a deliberate and recycled pattern – a tool used by white corporate giants..” It sounds good – until you read it carefully, and try to make sense of it. Firstly, what are ‘white corporate giants’? As much of the JSE is owned by pension funds, including the PIC, the majority of whose beneficiaries are not white, what is a ‘white corporate giant’? Can you give a few examples? Secondly, the claim that these ‘corporate giants’ are deliberately creating poverty among indigenous African people. Take a few examples – SABMiller, say, a large corporate. How does it create poverty among Africans, who are by far its largest customer base? By charging too much for beer? By running an owner/ driver programme which has lifted many African people out of poverty? If it is creating poverty – and I have yet to see any kind of explanation as to how – why would SABMiller do this to its main customer base? Surely that would be stupid, and also bad for business? Why would it want its own customers to be poor? The problem with so much of this rhetoric is it is just that – rhetoric – sounding good, but it just doesn’t stand up to any kind of analysis.

      January 12, 2013 at 9:58 am
    17. Msibisi #

      Dave Harris comment is as usual total rubbish that does not even pretend to be intelligent. The SA education system and media are set up to promote white supremacy? Really ? For all the SA education systems failings, promoting white supremacy is not one of them. And one can hardly accuse the SABC, the main media source in SA, of promoting white supremacy in any way….Such silly lies just make the writer seem absurd as well as bigoted.

      January 12, 2013 at 10:03 am
    18. ian shaw #

      I have quit my subscription to Thought Leader a long time ago. All of the interesting contributors and subjects have evaporated. Perhaps the unduly restrictive censorship caused this exodus.

      January 12, 2013 at 10:06 am
    19. 'whiteness' #

      @Sipho Singiswa

      “Is it not true that the highest individual and collective earners in the South African economy are still the minority white males?”

      Well yes, agreed – “white households earned on average about six times more a year than black households, R365,134 per annum,”

      BUT THEN – The proposed annual salary for MPs of R889 383, is apart from a range of perks including S & T, numerous flights, pension, medical aid and virtually free accommodation in Cape Town when Parliament is in session…………..In terms of the 5.5% raise for 2012/2013, the president’s salary could increase from
      R2 485 839 to R2 622 561……………………..The proposed increase would hike the salaries of ministers to just over the R2m mark, with deputy ministers earning around R1.6m a year.

      BUT DON’T TELL THE AVERAGE BLACK FAMILY THAT, ITS NOT PART OF THE DEBATE – IT’S THE GRAVY :-)

      January 12, 2013 at 10:13 am
    20. Momma Cyndi #

      Quite a fair assessment of the level (or lack thereof) of contributions to this topic. The loonies from all sides are derailing reality.

      A lot of people seem to have missed the irony of a black person telling black people not to listen to white people and then using a white person as a reference for that premise. Its a bit like a white person telling white people that we are intellectually superior and quoting Biko to prove their point

      A lot of the rhetoric is probably less about black and white and more about the disappearance of those categories. Racial categories are fast giving way to class categories. It is a slow process but a very notable one. That must make the frothing racial dividers and the self proclaimed spokespeople of the various races, very afraid indeed.

      January 12, 2013 at 10:16 am
    21. Momma Cyndi #

      Why do we have such a big divide between the ‘haves’ and have nots’?

      SA would have a large “middle class” if it were not for the unemployment. That is a factor that too many people ignore. The inequality would be vastly reduced if one black person, with a salary, was not supporting 10 to 20 family members who are not. That is why a white person who earns +R8,000 a month is considered ‘middle class’ but a black person who earns +R10,000 a month is considered ‘poor’. Now THAT is a symptom of the apartheid legacy – white people get jobs easier because it is easier to get a foot in the door.

      If the question is WHY white people (and indian people) get jobs easier then a whole mess of a stew comes to play. Education, CVs, history, english proficiency, attitude, options and AA – to name but a few.

      Believe it or not but the vast majority of white folk would love to see every person in this country be successful. Not because we are such nice people (okay, HUGE Gillian type exaggeration there), but because it would be the best thing for our beautiful country. If we had an unemployment rate or less than 10% and a tax paying base of more than 75% then many of our problems would disappear overnight

      January 12, 2013 at 10:19 am
    22. WTF #

      The vast majority of Whites in SA want the best for SA, and that is why they are so angry most of the time. Nobody wakes up in the morning and says ” Right, today, I am going to deliberately screw some poor black man over.”

      Most people are just trying to get by. Do the best they can for those that matter to them the most.

      January 12, 2013 at 11:26 am
    23. 'whiteness' #

      @Castro

      I agree, ‘white corporate giants’. Its blaming whites for faceless corporations that could have Indian, Japanese, Chinese or Black directors and shareholders.

      ‘White corporate giants’ is a racist label created by those who think they are holier than though and so pure.

      Corporations are not people, they are legal entities with no conscience, they operate according to a shareholder mandate, hopefully within the laws of the country.

      Yes, I am opposed to many giant corporations, including those coal mining corporations Cyril Ramaphosa has shares in that are killing Africa through climate change.

      January 12, 2013 at 11:42 am
    24. 'whiteness' #

      @Sipho Singiswa

      While I think your article is pretty balanced and thank you for it, I would like to take another exception to it;

      “Is it not true that those who still have access to prime land, the best medical care, schools, housing, sports and recreational facilities remain largely white … followed by the minority black elite? ”

      Again I blame the post apartheid government for that, you really cannot blame whites. The government were in a position to make a huge difference, but they really messed up. Instead of getting rid of white teachers, policies that chase white doctors out of the country, retiring honest white policemen, incompetence leading to collapsing services and infrastructure,………. if the post apartheid government had put practicalities ahead of ideology and corrupt incompetence, Nelson Mandela’s dream of a Rainbow Nation would be within our grasp.

      January 12, 2013 at 12:09 pm
    25. Facts People #

      McDonalds … need I say more, anyone heard of irony…and that is the future model for our economy. What does that mean? Replace everything we can do in SA ourselves by some hyped American cr$p that will increase obesity and our need for American patented drugs. Great idea Cyril Ramapoison

      January 12, 2013 at 1:17 pm
    26. Dick Beaumont #

      “In contrast to the false perception of a smooth transition from the apartheid rule to the so-called democratic South Africa, historically-based social inequalities and injustices are still deeply entrenched. These social inequities mirror both the colonial and apartheid era and are fuelled by corrupt corporate giants and officials who regularly defraud the state out of trillions of rands in income.”

      You make statements that need to be challenged: in the above paragraph you refer to “social inequities” caused by colonialism. Please elaborate on the type of house structure, the water supply, the standard of living etc. before these wicked white people arrived in Africa?
      Then there is the “defrauding”of the state – so you are happy for the state to confiscate your hard earned income, to pay for other people to live and do nothing? So men with creativity and talent, who put those talents to use, must be penalised by having their creativity plundered by the state? You are happy for the state to declare that those individuals do not have the right to the rewards of their ingenuity and productivity by confiscating the product of their work. And then you are happy that the state grants to the incompetent, the slothful, the lazy the right to unearned products without any effort?
      If there were companies that “defrauded” the state, why has the state not charged them in a court of law? You assume that these large corporations are wicked institutions, not that they actually employ…

      January 12, 2013 at 4:58 pm
    27. Dick Beaumont #

      If there were companies that “defrauded” the state, why has the state not charged them in a court of law? You assume that these large corporations are wicked institutions, not that they actually employ millions of people who are in their turn paying taxes to the same state?

      Have you ever stopped to consider what really causes poverty? Try large families. Since Union was declared in 1910 the black population has grown over 12 times whereas the “white” population has just about trebled. How can a man father, as is the case of the state president, more than 20 children? How can anyone ever hope to grant a good education to every child – is it not the responsibility of parents to do the best they possibly can for the next generation? The country simply cannot afford this exponential population growth.

      Try to get some balance in your column by using some rational

      January 12, 2013 at 4:59 pm
    28. Lucky Ntuli

      As I asked of your wife in her previous post, I so shall ask of you;
      What about Nkandla?

      I think one slot per family is way past due at the feeding trough.

      January 12, 2013 at 6:37 pm
    29. neil goodwin #

      Of course, Black plus White makes Grey – a colour that has come to represent humility and peasantry and age/maturity and which provides a natural camouflage that allows animals, particularly African animals, to blend in with their surroundings. So, does anyone fancy working out some dance steps to the new tune of Greyness?

      January 13, 2013 at 11:28 am
    30. Brian B #

      Mr Singiswa, your impeccable credentials as a veteran of the Liberation Struggle an ex MK Underground Operative and Robben Island Prisoner, a Social Justice Activist and Filmmaker are somehow not in keeping with your elaborate attempt to lay all that is wrong with South African society at the door of “whiteness”.
      Is this not just another feeble attempt to wallpaper over the incompetency, excesses and lack of integrity of the ruling cabal.
      “ Colonial and Apartheid era” “Business and political agenda’s of a white racist economy” “Institutionalised Racism and its , Economic Subjugation” “Entrenched white supremacy” “Habitual racist stereotyping of indigenous Africans”, “Self styled revolutionary plagiarists” “Misogyny and Patriarchal Gate Keeping”
      Sounds like Political dog whistling 101 to me ?
      I believe that “Umrabulo” means “Learning from each other in the midst of every situation”.
      This sounds like good sense to me because if all South Africans ,regardless of background work hard together to build the nation by sharing knowledge ,skills, enterprise there will be enough for all that want to participate.

      January 13, 2013 at 12:16 pm
    31. Gray #

      Yawn. The writer is correct that inequality is entrenched along racial lines in this country, but vilifying white people and painting them as more “evil” than blacks is such a hoary old chestnut. People act in self interest, black or white, and that is why establishing a suitable framework to foster equity is what the people of South Africa need to work towards, which, in a democracy is the responsibility of government as the articulation of the peoples voice on governance issues. Thus, Sipho, while you are absolutely correct to express your horror at the revolting inequality in this country, you need to recognise that if white people continue to benefit disproportionately, it is with the complicity of the black elite. The ANC government has sold the people that put them in power down the river, and you are complicit in covering that up by witch-hunting people that are simply following human nature.

      January 13, 2013 at 1:54 pm
    32. Benzo #

      Anybody with a sense of humor must be beginning to enjoy this sequence of blogs and its repsonses.
      The “black/white” divide has slowly moved to a more subtle debate about “whiteness”, a largely undefined name for something that is ascribed to anything related to the phenomenon “white” be it skin, economy, money, habits, products, criminal, selfish….you name it.

      I am waiting for the follow up blog to introduce “blackness” along similar lines. Skin will be the easiest bit, from there on it might become difficult to define the differences between the white/black as many of the above whiteness issues do exist and have existed for centuries in the various black-skinned population groups.

      I have referred earlier to the contineous mixing of the various population groups all over the world resutlng in mixed racial produce. From China to Africa, from Europe to South America, one can hardly find a person who can be proud to be a 100% specimen of a particular race, unless we introduce the term “raceness”.
      Introducing myself: my “raceness” is “whiteness”! Once I have married a black person, things become very complicated as I might loose some of my “whiteness” and than ??????????

      I wish all of you luck. I go to play some pool. The movements of the balls are more predictable than the outcome of pool on a table here the holes on the side change positions all the time and the balls change their colours as you touch them. Enjoy.

      January 13, 2013 at 3:23 pm
    33. Theo Marx #

      This is very relevant to South Africa as well. The white liberals are the the very people keeping blacks from any progress whatsoever. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdxQbBk4huA&feature=share

      January 13, 2013 at 9:14 pm
    34. Nkululeko #

      Black people must be afforded the space to deal with their scars. Today any Tom Dick and Harry has an opinion. They were quiet then when blacks were nothing. Let black people deal with their issues. Give us the fucking space to do that.

      January 14, 2013 at 12:05 am
    35. Mr. Direct #

      “Social Justice Activist” mentioned in the profile of the author, but it seems not activist for all.

      January 14, 2013 at 2:02 am
    36. Tofolux #

      @Sipho, I wonder which is worse though? But yes once again let us never grow tired of challenging and exposing these attitudes. Also, let us lead (like Schutte has done) in presenting the true reality as we experience it in our everyday lives and experiences. Sure there are those who plead that we should ”forget and move on” Let us not succumb to their pretentious and fatigued voices. Also, let us not be moved by the denialists in our midst. For all it is worth, these are the same people who deny that apartheid ever happened. Our battle against these ills must be re-constructed. We need to be more challenging and forthright in what we want. For far too long have we allowed ourselves to be sidetracked by unnecessary issues and non-debates and for this we must blame ourselves. For far too long have we allowed people such as journalists, editors, analysts, social commentators to be our voices. They are not our voices and they do not have a mandate to spk. They sensationalise in order to sell papers and to whom? It is not us who buy these pro-white utterances, it is the market to which they pander.Hence the discourse that has been invented in not the discourse that acts in the interest of blacks in general and africans in particular. We need to stop the interests of a minority to supercede the interests of the majority. .

      January 14, 2013 at 10:31 am
    37. Stewart Wood #

      When the article starts like this I cannot be bothered to continue reading what is obviously going to be inaccurate and biased drivel!

      “..institutionalised racism against indigenous African people has remained intact and largely unchallenged.”

      Such nonsense seems to be routinely trotted out lately. Do these writers understand the words they are writing?

      If ever ‘institutionalised’ racism is encountered there are legal and constitutional remedies.

      January 14, 2013 at 3:29 pm
    38. GrahamJ #

      Some intellectual comments above. Most not. Lots of blame but no suggestions for short, medium of long term action.

      This is a beautiful example of the incumbent government setting the example, and the faithful (logo loving) sheeple following that example.

      My suggestion is for blacks to eschew anything white that they don’t like (most things it seems – like electricity, radio, jeans, fried chicken, universities, etc.) and white people avoid anything black they don’t like (nothing comes immediately to mind).

      Peace will rule…

      January 14, 2013 at 5:12 pm
    39. -Sterling Ferguson #

      @Mao, the architects of poverty in black Africa are the African leaders themselves. The African leaders have set up economies based on extraction and only the elite in Africa have benefited from these economies in Africa. In SA since 1994 the manufacturing has been wiped out and there is very little being produced in SA except their minerals. What one sees in SA is widespread unemployment and the growth of poverty. Over half of the people have never had a job and live off family grants. SA will eventually go broke like like Greece.

      January 14, 2013 at 7:38 pm
    40. DeeGee #

      @ Tofolux: “For all it is worth, these are the same people who deny that apartheid ever happened.” You know of people who deny Apartheid ever happened? Really? That’s a first for me…. Seriously, are you pulling my leg, or have you just turned into a complete fantasist and a fabulist?

      “For far too long have we allowed people such as journalists, editors, analysts, social commentators to be our voices. They are not our voices and they do not have a mandate to spk.” Er, freedom of speech? Have you heard of it? As it turns out, they can say what they like. In the same way you can. Oh, and by the way, you certainly do not speak on my behalf. Just so we’re clear….

      January 15, 2013 at 7:45 am
    41. Noob #

      Deegee, why are you bothering?
      Tofolux utterly rejects the Constitution and bill of rights and detests white people. As the authority on everything, she speaks imperiously on behalf of everyone, and is violently allergic to alternative points of view

      January 15, 2013 at 11:19 am
    42. DeeGee #

      @Noob. Honestly, I’m not sure. It’s like a moth to a flame. I can’t help myself….

      January 15, 2013 at 2:12 pm
    43. Tofolux #

      @Deegee and Noob, could you possibly humour me with constructive counter-challenge to what I have put? I cannot simply travel way down there to engage on a level where even a Grade 1 has the natural ability to rebutt. Cmon now, its a new year, you are a year older and my gogo always reminds me that with age comes wisdom.

      January 15, 2013 at 3:05 pm
    44. Noob #

      But Tofolux, there is nothing to debate or rebut (one “t” btw).

      As always, you are and will be undoubtably right ….

      January 16, 2013 at 8:38 am
    45. Noob #

      (see if you can spot the mistake :) )

      January 16, 2013 at 8:40 am
    46. Tofolux #

      @Nob n Nob, someone once said that “you will never reach your destination if you stop and throw stones at every dog that barks”
      @Sipho, it is quite clear that there is some amongst us who wants to participate in a debate when the “organ grinder” is in the room, I guess it talks to capacity or cognitive ability to hold an honest and open discussion. Once again these reactions concludes with certainty the debate as put.

      January 16, 2013 at 1:25 pm
    47. noob #

      Tofolux, I like your “throwing stones at dogs” analogy: Zuma would approve.

      The irony is hilarious: you elude to an army of straw men, of which you are an expert at erecting and knocking down.

      It’s futile debating with you, not because of your self proclaimed intellectual acromegaly or rambling verbosity, but mostly because of your inflexible conviction of your own righteousness and correctness.

      Your posts are either a series of repetitive and compulsive race-based generalisations masquerading as truths or persistent appeals to authority.

      Sipho’s line: “This group of people frequently contradict themselves by weighing black people down with their regurgitated rhetoric and tedious volumes of references from the books of authors whose insight and application they fail to fully grasp” applies very nicely here.

      With all respect to your gogo, President Zuma is living proof that wisdom and age are indeed mutually exclusive….
      Anyway, I am sure you will continue to shower us with yours.

      January 17, 2013 at 3:57 am
    48. Comrade Koos #

      @Tofolux

      Calling Noob “@Nob n Nob” shows you are out of ideas, rational arguments and information to back up your view point. Name calling is not how to get your point across, people immediately dismiss you.

      January 17, 2013 at 9:01 am
    49. noob #

      Comrade Koos,
      Water off a ducks back, tjina.

      Convoluted wannabe-revolutionary rhetoric laced with thinly veiled racism delivered with shrill and sanctimonious sermonizing is a surefire way of winning over hearts and minds, hey!
      Yeah, right. Gillian Schutte should know

      I love posters like TLux who troll the M&G blogs spoiling for a fight: her combative, patronizing polemic cannot hide the fact that her beloved ANC elite have utterly betrayed the spirit of the freedom charter and are vigorously engaged in the neoliberal agenda, to their own great self enrichment.

      It is not the media that have ostracized the leftist socialist voice in this country: it is the ANC elite themselves that have cowed the ANCYL, rejected it’s call for nationalisation and have thrown out it’s strident ertswhile leader. It now finds itself castrated, leaderless and rudderless.
      It is the ANC itself that has silenced the likes of Tlux, and judging by the enormous amount of time she spends spewing vitriol on this blog, I suspect it’s the only space where she still has a voice.

      But rather than face the possibility that the ruling party is failing the very people it claims to uplift, she prefers to tilt at the windmills, blaming white capital, “whiteness” (whatever the hell that is), Westernism, the media etc. for all the nation’s ills.

      And for all this enormous outpouring of emotional vomitus, this armchair revolutionary offers not one plausible solution.

      January 18, 2013 at 4:28 am
    50. honesty #

      @ Nkululeko

      Yours is the most relevant comment on this thread. I hope that at some stage we will all realise that we first need to make peace with ourselves before we can make peace with others. That is not achieved by the ranting that goes on day in and day out on these fora. I sincerely wish you well on your voyage of discovery.

      January 22, 2013 at 9:01 am

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