Reader Blog

The shameless violence of Chicky Lamba

By Nikita Ramkissoon A recent video circulating social media called “Chicky Lamba” has caught the attention of the Indian South African community, and despite the appalling violence displayed, has become somewhat of a joke. It was first published on mybroadband, GunSite South Africa and Carforums before local comedian Riaad Moosa posted it on his Facebook…

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SA hungry for genuine, effective leaders

By Kriss Mukenge We want more because we sense at the core of our beings that proper leaders bring about positive, true and lasting change; we want more because our memories tell us that the greatest developments and innovations of our times were possible thanks to great leaders who dared to dream more, believe more…

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Being disabled doesn’t make you special, being South African does

By Maggie Marx In December 2005, I took my driver’s test in a small town in the Free State. I told the friendly, albeit mumbling officer that I was severely hearing impaired. I also told him that during the yard test I would be able to decipher his hand signals, but that when he got…

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Depression never leaves you

By Sifiso Yengwa With Robin Williams’ death still fresh in the minds of many, the issue of depression has once again come to the fore. Nowadays it is generally accepted that depression is a clinical condition that is manageable with drugs and other forms of prescribed treatment. Sadly the majority of people still hold a…

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Reflections on Gaza: How should my people be?

By Pedro Tabensky As the son of a Holocaust survivor and a refugee of mid-20th century turmoil, knowledge of the precariousness of existence has always been part of the fabric of my life, and has motivated me permanently to ask: How should I be in a way that pays respect to the suffering of my…

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Beating Ebola in a global village

By Anayo Unachukwu While I was writing this piece, I received a news alert from the Washington Post, about the arrival to the US of Dr Kent Brantly, an American doctor, who was infected with Ebola while working in Liberia with a Christian missionary organisation — Samaritan’s Purse. His repatriation to his country was not…

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Rethinking ‘townships’

By Lucille Dawkshas What are “townships”? I’ve often thought of them in terms of the visual meaning of outlying “ships” to the central harbour of a CBD, but what makes suburban areas any different? Wikipedia’s contributors tell me “townships” are: “the (often underdeveloped) urban living areas that, from the late 19th century until the end…

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The hospital has left the building

By Dr Shahra Sattar On Duinefontein Road in Manenberg there is a building that used to be GF Jooste Hospital. This building is not beautiful by any stretch. There are no glittering mosaics or eco-friendly manicured lawns greeting you at its entrance promising a fantastic service. No, this building is surrounded by a train track,…

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Auschwitz should put us off our food

By Trevor Sacks While a crudely assembled advert that ran in the Mail & Guardian featuring pictures of a pork factory farm and concentration camp prisoners side by side was naïve, the reaction from Caryn Gootkin in her piece, “I’m a Jew, not a pig” is misplaced. Quite rightly, we’re shocked by pictures of the…

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I’m a Jew, not a pig

By Caryn Gootkin Today’s Mail & Guardian carries the following (what appears to be a) plea to Pick n Pay to stand against cruelty to pigs. It is supposedly an advertisement, because the newspaper apparently knows nothing about it. Chris Roper, the editor, placed an apology on their website. In it he states: ”Owing to…

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