Koketso Moeti

Time to say goodbye to police’s R5 assault rifles

A bold campaign has been launched by Gun Free South Africa and amandla.mobi calling on the minister of police, Nkosinathi Nhleko, and National Police Commissioner Riah Phiyega to disarm the police’s crowd-control units of their deadly R5 rifles. The R5 assault rifle is based on the Israeli Galil, which was inspired by the AK-47. It…

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Debunking the ‘five million taxpayers’ myth

To evidence the “unsustainability” of social grants, it is often pointed out that in South Africa “there are only five million tax-paying citizens and 15-million social grants recipients”. The insinuation made is that the five million single-handedly subsidise the poor, thus bearing the brunt of the social assistance burden. This argument, however, ignores that income…

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The unfinished business of the TRC

Acting on the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), in 2003 the President’s Fund was set up to provide comprehensive reparations programmes for victims of apartheid crimes. It was intended to restore and repair the damaged lives of those who stood for justice against the apartheid regime. This was to be done through…

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Young South Africans still slipping through the cracks

To commemorate the brave stance taken by the youth of 1976, the month of June is dedicated as youth month to celebrate young people in the country — with June 16 used to commemorate the youth of 1976. This year’s celebrations were particularly notable, as South Africa celebrates its 20th year of democracy. The month…

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Pistorius and the unfinished gun ownership debate

When Oscar Pistorius first entered the courtroom where he stood accused of murdering his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, the case raised great interest. It was followed online, on radio and even watched on TV, where it received a lot of coverage. While some see the spotlight put on gun ownership by the trial as nothing but…

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My Mandela blues

“Mandela is dead”, these are the words that came out of my mouth the moment Radio 702 presenter Gushwell Brooks informed listeners that Jacob Zuma had an announcement of national importance to make. My sensible and realistic nature overtook me; the man was 95 after all. He had lived a full life, so to me…

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Black story, white lens

Thapelo Tselapedi recently wrote about how “black stories are in the form of service delivery protests, which are characterised by angry mobs stealing electricity, invading lands and tossing poo”. He goes on to share many other ways in which black stories are warped and twisted, noting that: “Such stories don’t engage black politics in any…

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The lies we tell ourselves about being ‘on the ground’

During ‘Youth Month’, I was invited as a panellist to the Activate! Exchange hosted in Johannesburg. ‘Being heard’ was a recurring theme in the earlier break-away sessions, so during panel discussions I pointed out that there’s a danger in demanding to be heard ‘out there’ when we ourselves are failing to listen to each other….

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Rail services still treat us like cattle

Dear Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, I don’t usually write open letters and have tried to engage you in more direct ways. I was one of the groups kept back by security at your Pretoria Station not too long ago and I am a regular visitor at your customer care booth at Park Station….

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Why the Zimmerman verdict matters in SA

Trayvon Martin was a 17-year-old boy who walked to a 7-Eleven in Sanford, Florida, for a bag of Skittles and a can of iced tea. During what would be his final walk back to his father’s home, he came across neighbourhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman who subsequently stalked him. This is believed to have led…

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